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Trammell & Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art

2010 Flora St., Dallas, TX

Phone:
1-(214)-979-6430

Website:
www.crowcollection.org

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Featured Event

Hidden Nature: Sopheap Pich

Museum,Sculpture

The Crow Collection of Asian Art is pleased to announce the presentation of a solo exhibition of the work of Sopheap Pich, recognized today as Cambodia’s most internationally prominent contemporary artist. This exhibition will feature his large-scale sculpture, Rang Phnom Flower (2015), his most ambitious single-form sculpture to date. Twenty-five feet in length, its complex construction is composed of hundreds of strands of rattan and bamboo. The sculpture is that of the cannonball tree (“rang phnom” in Khmer), which in Southeast Asia is associated with the sal tree under which the Buddha was born. This tree is often planted near Buddhist temples; many can be found around the temples near Pich’s studio on the outskirts of Phnom Penh. In fact, the plant originated in the Americas and was introduced by Europeans to Sri Lanka, where it was soon revered for its resemblance to the sal tree, which does not grow in tropical climates. It was then brought to Southeast Asia by Sri Lankans, who were responsible for the revitalization of Buddhism in that region. Pich’s tree is created at enormous over-sized scale, which conveys the power of nature, but also brings forward the plant’s abstract qualities by using precise grid–like structure and geometric shapes, in order to consider concepts of scale, the natural and the industrial, and the large that can be found within the small.

Information:

• Tue 12/12/17 - Thu 12/14/17 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 12/15/17 - Sun 12/17/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Tue 12/19/17 - Thu 12/21/17 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 12/22/17 - Sun 12/24/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Tue 12/26/17 - Thu 12/28/17 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 12/29/17 - Sun 12/31/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Tue 1/2/18 - Thu 1/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 1/5/18 - Sun 1/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Other Upcoming Events

Styled with Poise: Figures in Japanese Paintings & Prints

Museum

Paintings and Prints displays art from the Edo period (1603–1868), when a wide range of painting styles and significant developments in woodblock printmaking made visual art accessible to many in Japan. Figures in hanging scrolls and screens helped adorn residences, especially in the larger metropolitan areas such as in Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo (current-day Tokyo), during a time when interior decorations were still sparse. While religious scrolls with important Buddhist figures for worship such as Amida Buddha and other bodhisattva, hung in temple halls, depictions of people engaged in daily activities, and other popular subjects were enjoyed in the homes of wealthier townsmen. Historical figures were often heralded as upholding the ideals of the past and even ghosts – or figures who met unfortunate or untimely deaths – came to be depicted in painted form.

Information:

• Tue 12/12/17 - Thu 12/14/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Invisible Cities

Gallery

The Crow Collection of Asian Art, Dallas Contemporary, and the Moving Image Archive for Contemporary Art: MIACA (Hong Kong), are pleased to announce to co-organize Invisible Cities, an exhibition and screening series that showcases more than twenty contemporary video works by renowned and emerging artists from China, Japan, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, Myanmar, and Vietnam. Seen together as a series of video installations and screenings at Dallas Contemporary and at the Crow Collection of Asian Art, these pivotal artistic works outline recent developments in the moving image art in Asia.

Information:

• Tue 12/12/17 - Thu 12/14/17 at 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
• Fri 12/15/17 - Sun 12/17/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Styled with Poise: Figures in Japanese Paintings & Prints

Museum

Paintings and Prints displays art from the Edo period (1603–1868), when a wide range of painting styles and significant developments in woodblock printmaking made visual art accessible to many in Japan. Figures in hanging scrolls and screens helped adorn residences, especially in the larger metropolitan areas such as in Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo (current-day Tokyo), during a time when interior decorations were still sparse. While religious scrolls with important Buddhist figures for worship such as Amida Buddha and other bodhisattva, hung in temple halls, depictions of people engaged in daily activities, and other popular subjects were enjoyed in the homes of wealthier townsmen. Historical figures were often heralded as upholding the ideals of the past and even ghosts – or figures who met unfortunate or untimely deaths – came to be depicted in painted form.

Information:

• Fri 12/15/17 - Sun 12/17/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Tue 12/19/17 - Thu 12/21/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Fri 12/22/17 - Sun 12/24/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Tue 12/26/17 - Thu 12/28/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Fri 12/29/17 - Sun 12/31/17 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Tue 1/2/18 - Thu 1/4/18 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
• Fri 1/5/18 - Sun 1/7/18 at 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM